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Nanoparticle-Decorated Surfaces for the Study of Cell-Protein-Substrate Interactions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011


Jake D. Ballard
Affiliation:
Materials Science & Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA. Rensselaer Nanotechnology Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA.
Ludovico M. Dell'Acqua-Bellavitis
Affiliation:
Engineering Science, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA. Rensselaer Nanotechnology Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA.
Rena Bizios
Affiliation:
Biomedical Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA. Rensselaer Nanotechnology Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA.
Richard W. Siegel
Affiliation:
Materials Science & Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA. Rensselaer Nanotechnology Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA.

Abstract

The present study was motivated by the need for accurately-controlled and well-characterized novel biomaterial formulations for the study of cell-protein-material interactions. For this purpose, the current research has focused on the design, fabrication and characterization of model native oxide-coated silicon surfaces decorated with silica nanoparticles of select sizes, and has examined the adhesion of osteoblasts and fibroblasts on these nanoparticle-decorated surfaces. The results demonstrate the capability to deposit nanoparticles of select diameters and substrate surface coverage onto native silicon oxide-coated silicon, the firm attachment of these nanoparticles to the underlying native silicon oxide, and that nanoparticle size and coverage modulate adhesion of osteoblasts and fibroblasts to these substrates. The material formulations tested provide a well-controlled and well-characterized set of model substrates needed to study the effects of nanoscale features on the functions of cells that are critical to the clinical fate of implantable biomaterials.


Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2005

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References

1. Webster, T. J., Schadler, L. S., Siegel, R. W., and Bizios, R., Tissue Engineering 7, 291 (2001).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2. McManus, A.J., Doremus, R. H., Siegel, R.W., and Bizios, R., J. Biomed. Mat. Res. (Published Online 10 November 2004).Google Scholar
3. Webster, T. J., Ergun, C., Doremus, R. H., Siegel, R. W., and Bizios, R., J. Biomed. Mat. Res. 51, 475 (2000).3.0.CO;2-9>CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4. Puleo, D. A., Holleran, L. H., Doremus, R. H., Bizios, R., J. Biomed. Mat. Res. 25, 711 (1991).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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