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MOVPE GaN Gas-Phase Chemistry for Reactor Design and Optimization

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2011

S. A. Safvi
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706
J. M. Redwing
Affiliation:
Epitronics, 7 Commerce Dr., Danbury, CT 06810
A. Thon
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706
J. S. Flynn
Affiliation:
Epitronics, 7 Commerce Dr., Danbury, CT 06810
M. A. Tischler
Affiliation:
Epitronics, 7 Commerce Dr., Danbury, CT 06810
T. F. Kuech
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706
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Abstract

The results of gas phase decomposition studies are used to construct a chemistry model which is compared to data obtained from an experimental MOVPE reactor. A flow tube reactor is used to study gas phase reactions between trimethylgallium (TMG) and ammonia at high temperatures, characteristic to the metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) of GaN. Experiments were performed to determine the effect of the mixing of the Group III precursors and Group V precursors on the growth rate, growth uniformity and film properties. Growth rates are predicted for simple reaction mechanisms and compared to those obtained experimentally. Quantification of the loss of reacting species due to oligmerization is made based on experimentally observed growth rates. The model is used to obtain trends in growth rate and uniformity with the purpose of moving towards better operating conditions.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1997

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References

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