Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Modeling and Numerical Simulations of Microdiffraction from Deformed Crystals

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011


R.I. Barabash
Affiliation:
Metals and Ceramics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6118
G.E. Ice
Affiliation:
Metals and Ceramics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6118
F.J. Walker
Affiliation:
Metals and Ceramics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6118

Abstract

Brilliant synchrotron microprobes offer new opportunities for the analysis of stress/strain and deformation distributions in crystalline materials. Polychromatic x-ray microdiffraction is emerging as a particularly important tool because it allows for local crystal-structure measurements in highly deformed or polycrystalline materials where sample rotations complicate alternative methods; a complete Laue pattern is generated in each volume element intercepted by the probe beam. Although a straightforward approach to the measurement of stress/strain fields through white-beam Laue microdiffraction has been demonstrated, a comparable method for determining the plastic-deformation tensor has not been established. Here we report on modeling efforts that can guide automated fitting of plastic-deformation-tensor distributions in three dimensions.


Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2002

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1. Darwin, C.G., Phil.Mag., 27, 315, 657, (1914); 43, 800 (1922)Google Scholar
2. Krivoglaz, M.A., Theory of X-Ray and Thermal Neutron Scattering by Real Crystals, Plenum Press, New York, 1969 Google Scholar
3. Warren, B.E., X-ray diffraction, (Dover Publications, INC., New York, 1969)Google Scholar
4. Wilkens, M., Phys. Stat. Sol. A. 2, 359370, (1970); Fundamental Aspects of Dislocation Theory II, p. 1195–1221, Edited by J.A. Simmons, R. de Wit and R. Bullough, Washington: Nat.Bur.Stand. Special Publ.317, II, pp. K1-K7,(1970).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5. Wilkens, M., Ungar, T., Mughrabi, H., Phys. Stat. Sol.(a) (1987) 104,157170.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. Lang, C.H., Schneider, W., Mughrabi, H., Acta Metall. Mater. (1995), 43, 5,17511764 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7. Thomson, R. and Levine, L.E., Acta Cryst. A53, (1997), 590602.Google Scholar
8. Barabash, R. and Klimanek, P., J. Appl. Cryst., 32, (1999), 10501059.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9. Barabash, R., Klimanek, P. Z. Metallkunde, 92, (2001), 1, 7075.Google Scholar
10. Lauridsen, E.M., Jensen, D. Juul, Poulsen, H.F., Lienert, U., Scr. Mat. (2000) 43, 561566 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
11. Margulies, L., Winther, G., Poulsen, H.F., Science, (2001) 291, 23922394 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12. Chung, J.S., Ice, G., J.Appl.Phys., (1999) 86, 9, 52495255.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
13. Larson, B.C., Tamura, N., Chung, J.S., Ice, G., Budai, J.D., Tischler, J.Z., Yang, W., Weiland, H., Lowe, W.P., Proc.Mat.Res.Soc.Symp. Fall, 590, 247, (2000).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
14. Buras, B. and Tazzari, S., European Synchrotron Radiation Facility Report of European Synchrotron Radiation Project, Cern LEP Division, Geneva, Switzerland, (1984).Google Scholar
15. Shenoy, G.K., Viccaro, P.J., and Mills, D.M., Characteristics of the 7 GeV Advanced Photon Source:A Guide for Users (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL, 1988), No. ANL-88-9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
16. Ice, G.E., X-Ray Spectrum. 26, 315 (1997).3.0.CO;2-N>CrossRefGoogle Scholar
17. Marcus, M.A., Macdowell, A.A., Isaacs, E.D., Evans-Lutterodt, K., Ice, G., Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. vol. 428, (1996), 545556.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
18. Chung, J.S., Tamura, N., Ice, G., Larson, B.C., Budai, J.D., Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. Vol.563, (1999), 169174.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
19. Barabash, R., Ice, G.E., Larson, B.C., Pharr, G.M., Chung, K.-S., Yang, W., APL, 79, 4, (2001)Google Scholar
20. Nabarro, F.R.N. (1987), Theory of Crystal Dislocations. New York: Dover Publications, INC. Google Scholar
21. The submitted manuscript has been authored by a contractor of the U.S. Government under contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725. Accordingly, the U.S. Government retains a nonexclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U.S. Government purposesGoogle Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 4 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 4th December 2020. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Hostname: page-component-b4dcdd7-bf5bq Total loading time: 0.468 Render date: 2020-12-04T19:01:14.650Z Query parameters: { "hasAccess": "0", "openAccess": "0", "isLogged": "0", "lang": "en" } Feature Flags last update: Fri Dec 04 2020 19:00:35 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time) Feature Flags: { "metrics": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "peerReview": true, "crossMark": true, "comments": true, "relatedCommentaries": true, "subject": true, "clr": false, "languageSwitch": true }

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Modeling and Numerical Simulations of Microdiffraction from Deformed Crystals
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Modeling and Numerical Simulations of Microdiffraction from Deformed Crystals
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Modeling and Numerical Simulations of Microdiffraction from Deformed Crystals
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *