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MOCVD Growth of High-Hole Concentration (>2×1019 cm−3) P-Type InGaN for Solar Cell Application

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 March 2011


Hongbo Yu
Affiliation:
School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332
Andrew Melton
Affiliation:
School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332
Omkar Jani
Affiliation:
Institute of Energy Conversion, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716
Balakrishnam Jampana
Affiliation:
Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716
Shenjie Wang
Affiliation:
School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332
Shalini Gupta
Affiliation:
School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332
John Buchanan
Affiliation:
School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332
William Fenwick
Affiliation:
School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332
Ian Ferguson
Affiliation:
School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332

Abstract

InGaN alloys are widely researched in diverse optoelectronic applications. This material has also been demonstrated as a photovoltaic material. This paper presents the study to achieve optimum electrically active p-type InGaN epi-layers. Mg doped InGaN films with 20% In composition are grown on GaN templates/sapphire substrates by MOCVD. It is found that the hole concentration of p-type InGaN depends strongly on the Mg flow rate and V/III molar ratio and hole concentration greater than 2×1019 cm−3 has been achieved at room temperature. The optimum activation temperature of Mg-doped InGaN layer has been found to be 550-600°C, which is lower than that of Mg-doped GaN. A solar cell was realized successfully using the InGaN epi-layers presented here.


Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2009

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References

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MOCVD Growth of High-Hole Concentration (>2×1019 cm−3) P-Type InGaN for Solar Cell Application
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