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Micro/Nanofabrication by Spin Dewetting on a Poly(Dimethylsiloxane) Mold

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 March 2011

Nicholas Ferrell
Affiliation:
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Ohio State University, 1080 Carmack Rd., 270 Bevis Hall, Columbus, OH, 43210
Aimee Bross
Affiliation:
Nanoscale Patterning Laboratory, Ohio State University, 205 Dreese Laboratory, 2015 Neil Ave., Columbus, OH, 43210
Derek Hansford
Affiliation:
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Ohio State University, 1080 Carmack Rd., 270 Bevis Hall, Columbus, OH, 43210
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Abstract

The process of spin dewetting was used to fabricate polymer micro and nanostructures from poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), poly (propyl methacrylate) (PPMA), and polystyrene (PS). Polymer structures were formed on poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) molds by dewetting of a polymer solution during spin coating. Features were removed from the mold using heat and pressure to transfer the polymer to silicon or glass substrates. By varying the coating conditions, a variety of different polymer feature morphologies were obtained for a given PDMS mold geometry. In this study, the ability to fabrication polymer micro and nanostructures using spin dewetting was demonstrated on a variety of PDMS mold geometries. The effects of polymer solution concentration and mold feature size on the resulting polymer structures were examined. In addition, microfabricated PMMA structures were used as etch masks for anisotropic etching of silicon in an aqueous solution of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH).

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2007

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Micro/Nanofabrication by Spin Dewetting on a Poly(Dimethylsiloxane) Mold
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