Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-559fc8cf4f-6pznq Total loading time: 0.216 Render date: 2021-02-25T14:41:50.290Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Mechanical and Thermo-Mechanical Protection by Alumina Sol-Gel Coatings

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 February 2011

Mark F. Gruninger
Affiliation:
Rutgers University, Center for Ceramics Research, Box 909, Piscataway, N. J., 08854
John B. Wachtman
Affiliation:
Rutgers University, Center for Ceramics Research, Box 909, Piscataway, N. J., 08854
Richard A. Haber
Affiliation:
Rutgers University, Center for Ceramics Research, Box 909, Piscataway, N. J., 08854
Get access

Abstract

Alumina coatings made by the sol-gel process using aluminum sec butox-ide can be made with variable surface area and porosity by firing on dense alumina substrates in the firing range 700 to 1000 C. These coatings are found to have large (over 100 MPa) compressive stresses and to cause a small but significant strengthening of the substrates. Within this firing range the surface area decreases while both the internal stress and strengthening effect increase with increasing firing temperature. Wear rate values are high but decrease with increasing firing temperature.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1986

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1. Siemers, P. A. and Mehan, Richard L., Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, 4, 828, (1983).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2. Kingery, W. D., Bowen, H. K., and Uhlmann, D. R., Introduction to Ceramics. 2nd edition (John Wiley & Sons, 1975), p. 638.Google Scholar
3. Klein, L. C., Ceramic Engineering & Science Proceedings, 1, 379, (1984).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4. Dislich, H. and Hinz, P., J. Non-Crystalline Solids 48, 11 (1982).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5. Catone, D. L. and Matijevic, E., J. Colloid, and Interface Science, 48, 291 (1974).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. Yoldas, B. E., Ceramic Bulletin, 54, 286 (1975).Google Scholar
7. Yoldas, B. E., Applied Optics, 21, 2960 (1982).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8. Nikolic, Lj., Bailey, J. E. and Ristic, M. M., Sintering - Theory and Practice (Elsevier Science Publishers, Amsterdam, 1982), p. 168.Google Scholar
9. Lee, B. I. and Hench, L. L., Mat. Res. Soc. Symp Proc. 32, 307 (1984).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10. Martinsen, J., Figat, R. A. and Shafer, M. W., Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. 32, 145 (1984).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
11. Lannutti, J. J. and Clark, D. E., Mat. Res. Symp. Proc. 32, 369 (1984).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12. Salvati, L. and Macey, C. J., Perkin-Elmer Corporation (unpublished).Google Scholar
13. Lawn, B. R. and Fuller, E. R. Jr, Materials, J. Sci., 19, 4061 (1984).Google Scholar
14. Scherer, G. W. and Garino, Terry, J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 68, 216 (1985).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
15. Bordia, R. K. and Raj, R., J. Am. Ceram. Soc, 68, 287 (1985).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
16. Blau, P., Tribology International, Vol. 15, No. 4, 209 (1982).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
17. Wu, C. and Rice, R. W., to be published in Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings.Google Scholar
18. Hasselman, D. P. H. and Youngblood, G. E., J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 61, 49 (1978).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
19. Gruninger, M. F., Lawn, B. R., and Farabaugh, E. N., to be published.Google Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 7 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 25th February 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Mechanical and Thermo-Mechanical Protection by Alumina Sol-Gel Coatings
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Mechanical and Thermo-Mechanical Protection by Alumina Sol-Gel Coatings
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Mechanical and Thermo-Mechanical Protection by Alumina Sol-Gel Coatings
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *