Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Materials analysis by aberration-corrected STEM

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011


Ondrej L. Krivanek
Affiliation:
Nion Co., 1102 8th St, Kirkland, WA 98033, USA
Neil J. Bacon
Affiliation:
Nion Co., 1102 8th St, Kirkland, WA 98033, USA
George C. Corbin
Affiliation:
Nion Co., 1102 8th St, Kirkland, WA 98033, USA
Niklas Dellby
Affiliation:
Nion Co., 1102 8th St, Kirkland, WA 98033, USA
Andrew McManama-Smith
Affiliation:
Nion Co., 1102 8th St, Kirkland, WA 98033, USA
Matthew F. Murfitt
Affiliation:
Nion Co., 1102 8th St, Kirkland, WA 98033, USA
Peter D. Nellist
Affiliation:
Dept. of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
Zoltan S. Szilagyi
Affiliation:
Nion Co., 1102 8th St, Kirkland, WA 98033, USA

Abstract

Electron-optical aberration correction has recently progressed from a promising concept to a powerful research tool. 100–120 kV scanning transmission electron microscopes (STEMs) equipped with spherical aberration (Cs) correctors now achieve sub-Å resolution in high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging, and a 300 kV Cs-corrected STEM has reached 0.6 Å HAADF resolution. Moreover, the current available in an atom-sized probe has grown by about 10x, allowing electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) to detect single atoms. We summarize the factors that have made this possible, and outline likely future progress.


Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2004

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1. Dellby, N., Krivanek, O.L., Nellist, P.D., Batson, P.E. and Lupini, A.R., J. Electron Microscopy 50, 177 (2001).Google Scholar
2. Nellist, P.D. et al., Science 305, 1741 (2004).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Sohlberg, K. et al., ChemPhysChem, in press.Google Scholar
4. Abe, E., Yan, Y. and Pennycook, S.J., Nature Materials 3, 759 (2004).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5. Shibata, N., et al., Nature 428, 730 (2004).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. Chisholm, M. F. et al., to be published.Google Scholar
7. Batson, P.E., Dellby, N. and Krivanek, O.L., Nature 418, 617 (2002).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8. Varela, M., et al., Phys Rev Let. 92, 095502 (2004).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9. Falke, U., Bleloch, A.L., Falke, M., Teichert, S., Phys Rev. Lett. 92, 116103 (2004).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10. Yu, B.D. et al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B 19, 1180 (2001).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
11. Tung, R.T., Gibson, J.M. and Poate, J.M., Phys Rev. Lett. 50, 429 (1983).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12. Bleloch, A.L., private communication (2003).Google Scholar
13. Krivanek, O.L., Nellist, P.D. and Dellby, N., US patent #6, 770, 887.Google Scholar
14. Krivanek, O.L. et al., Ultramicrosscopy 96, 229 (2003).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
15. Scherzer, O., Optik 2, 114 (1947).Google Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 5 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 5th December 2020. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Hostname: page-component-b4dcdd7-ltw6j Total loading time: 0.242 Render date: 2020-12-05T08:50:19.141Z Query parameters: { "hasAccess": "0", "openAccess": "0", "isLogged": "0", "lang": "en" } Feature Flags last update: Sat Dec 05 2020 08:00:32 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time) Feature Flags: { "metrics": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "peerReview": true, "crossMark": true, "comments": true, "relatedCommentaries": true, "subject": true, "clr": false, "languageSwitch": true }

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Materials analysis by aberration-corrected STEM
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Materials analysis by aberration-corrected STEM
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Materials analysis by aberration-corrected STEM
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *