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Magnetite-PLGA Microparticles for Oral Delivery of Insulin

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Jianjun Cheng
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering
Christopher H. Yim
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering
Benjamin A. Teply
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering
Dennis Ho
Affiliation:
Department of Biology
Omid C. Farokhzad
Affiliation:
Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 Department of Anesthesiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115
Robert S. Langer
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering
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Abstract

Magnetic responsive particles were designed for use in oral delivery of insulin. Magnetite nanoparticles (12 nm average size) were synthesized and co-encapsulated with insulin into poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microparticles (4.6 ± 2.2 μm average particle size) through the double-emulsion method. The spherical structures of resulting microparticles were well maintained at magnetite content 5 wt % or less. Mice were gavaged with 125I-insulin-magnetitePLGA microparticles and a circumferential trans-abdominal magnetic field was applied forty minutes after administration to retard the transit of the microparticles in the intestinal tract. As control, mice were similarly dosed without the subsequent trans-abdominal magnetic field. Mice were sacrificed, and the intestinal radioactivity was 101% and 145% higher in treated mice versus the control at 6 h and 12 h, respectively. A single administration of 50 unit/kg Humulin Rmagnetite-PLGA microparticles to the fasted mice resulted in 66% reduction of blood glucose level in the presence of external magnetic field at 12 h, compared to 27% reduction in the absence of magnetic field.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2005

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