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Laser Induced Nanofabrication on Titanium Thin Films

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

B.D. Huey
Affiliation:
University of Pennsylvania, Dept. of Materials Science, Philadelphia, PA
D.A. Bonnell
Affiliation:
University of Pennsylvania, Dept. of Materials Science, Philadelphia, PA
A.D. Akhsakhalian
Affiliation:
Institute for Physics of Microstructures, N. Novgorod, Russia
A.A. Gorbunov
Affiliation:
Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Arbeitsgruppe “Mechanik heterogener Festkorper,” Dresden, Germany.
A. Sewing
Affiliation:
Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Arbeitsgruppe “Mechanik heterogener Festkorper,” Dresden, Germany.
W. Pompe
Affiliation:
Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Arbeitsgruppe “Mechanik heterogener Festkorper,” Dresden, Germany.
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Abstract

Illumination of titanium thin films with an argon-ion laser has been used to fabricate nanometer scale features by localized oxidation. The laser induces a temperature gradient in the metal film, within which oxidation may occur. Due to the non-linearity of the reaction with temperature, the reaction zone can be laterally confined to regions narrower than the diffraction limit of optical resolution. Scanning probe microscopy indicates widths ranging from 105 to 600 nm and heights of 0.8 to 30 nm. The possibility of forming novel structures is demonstrated.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1996

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References

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