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Interstitial Silicon Sink Efficiency of Dislocations Studied by Gold Diffusion in FZ and Cz Samples

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

G. Mariani
Affiliation:
Lab. MATOP-CNRS, Fac. Se. St-Jérôme, case 151, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20, France
B. Pichaud
Affiliation:
Lab. MATOP-CNRS, Fac. Se. St-Jérôme, case 151, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20, France
E. Yakimov
Affiliation:
Institute of Microelectronics Technology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 142432 Chernogolovka, Russia
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Abstract

The substitutional gold concentration introduced by a diffusion step between 850 and 1000°C was measured by Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) both in FZ and Cz silicon containing different dislocation densities introduced by cantilever bending. The comparison, in the same sample, of dislocated and undislocated regions allows first the self interstitial (Sii) effective diffusivity and then the efficiency of dislocations as sinks for self-interstitials γto be measured. In FZ silicon, γ is quite independent of temperature whereas in Cz Si a remarkable temperature dependence was observed, with an effective activation energy of leV, which can be attributed to the release of dislocations by a thermally stimulated climbing mechanism from obstacles (oxygen segregation or precipitation). Increasing the gold diffusion annealing times for a given temperature (850°C) underlines once more the role of the oxygen precipitation in the samples.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1997

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References

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