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Interactions of Hydrating Tricalcium and Dicalcium Silicate using Time-Resolved Quasielastic Neutron Scattering

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Vanessa K. Peterson
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Maryland College Park, MD 20742, U.S.A. Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology Gaithersburg, MD 20899–8562, U.S.A.
Dan A. Neumann
Affiliation:
Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology Gaithersburg, MD 20899–8562, U.S.A.
Richard A. Livingston
Affiliation:
Federal Highways Administration McLean, VA 22101, U.S.A.
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Abstract

Hydrating tricalcium and dicalcium silicate mixtures were studied using time-resolved quasielastic neutron scattering. Application of a hydration model allowed the extraction of several parameters describing the hydration mechanics. The hydration rate during the nucleation and growth period, diffusivity during the diffusion limited regime, and the maximum amount of product able to be formed were not related linearly to the mixture combinations. Addition of dicalcium silicate at approximately 20 wt. % caused a sharp alteration to these parameters, including reduced hydration rate and reaction layer permeability. These two factors lead to the prediction that more reaction products would be ultimately manufactured during the reactions at this composition.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2005

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Interactions of Hydrating Tricalcium and Dicalcium Silicate using Time-Resolved Quasielastic Neutron Scattering
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