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In-Situ Hvem Studies of Radiation-Induced Segregation In Ni-Al Alloys During Simultaneous Irradiation with Electrons and Ions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 February 2011

M. J. Giacobbe
Affiliation:
Argonne National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, Argonne, IL 60439 University of Illinois at Urbana, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Urbana, IL 61801
N. Q. Lam
Affiliation:
Argonne National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, Argonne, IL 60439
P. R. Okamoto
Affiliation:
Argonne National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, Argonne, IL 60439
J. F. Stubbins
Affiliation:
University of Illinois at Urbana, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Urbana, IL 61801
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Abstract

The effects of 75-keV Ne+ and 300-keV Ni+ bombardment on electron radiation-induced segregation (RIS) in a Ni-9at%Al alloy were investigated in-situ using the HVEM (high voltage electron microscope)/Tandem accelerator facility at Argonne National Laboratory. The radial component of defect fluxes generated by a highly-focused 900-keV electron beam was used to induce segregation of Al atoms towards the center of the electron irradiated area via the inverse-Kirkendall effect. The radial segregation rate was monitored by measuring the increase in the diameter of the Al enriched zone within which γ'-νi3αl precipitates form during irradiation. Both dual electron-ion and pre-implanted ion-electron irradiations were performed in an attempt to separate the contributions of energetic displacement cascades and implanted ions acting as defect trapping sites to RIS suppression. It was found that 75-keV Ne implantation has a retarding effect on RIS.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1996

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References

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In-Situ Hvem Studies of Radiation-Induced Segregation In Ni-Al Alloys During Simultaneous Irradiation with Electrons and Ions
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