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Influence of substrate surface morphology on defect generation during silicon carbide single crystal growth

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Myung Yoon Um
Affiliation:
School of Material Science and Engineering, Seoul National Univ., Seoul, 151-742, Korea
Jae Kyeong Jeong
Affiliation:
School of Material Science and Engineering, Seoul National Univ., Seoul, 151-742, Korea
Bum Seok Kim
Affiliation:
School of Material Science and Engineering, Seoul National Univ., Seoul, 151-742, Korea
Hoon Joo Na
Affiliation:
School of Material Science and Engineering, Seoul National Univ., Seoul, 151-742, Korea
In Bok Song
Affiliation:
School of Material Science and Engineering, Seoul National Univ., Seoul, 151-742, Korea
Hyeong Joon Kim
Affiliation:
School of Material Science and Engineering, Seoul National Univ., Seoul, 151-742, Korea
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Abstract

6H-SiC single crystals were grown on various substrates, treated mechanically and chemically in different conditions, by physical vapor transport. To investigate the defect evolution according to the different substrate treatment prior to the growth, the grown crystals were examined by optical micrograph, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and molten KOH etching technique. The smoother substrate surface was, the lower defect density the grown SiC had. The highest quality SiC crystal was grown on substrate etched by hydrogen after polished by 0.25 νm diamond paste, having an edge/screw dislocation density of 7.3 ×102 / cm2 without micropipes. Defects, such as dislocations and micropipes, of the grown crystals are found to be strongly correlated with the substrate morphology.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2002

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