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Impedance Spectroscopy and the Role of Admixtures in the Hydration of Portland Cement Pastes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

Bruce J. Christensen
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Center for Advanced Cement-Based Materials, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208.
Thomas O. Mason
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Center for Advanced Cement-Based Materials, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208.
Hamlin M. Jennings
Affiliation:
Department of Civil Engineering, Center for Advanced Cement-Based Materials, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208.
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Abstract

Measurements of the bulk electrical properties of cement pastes were made using impedance spectroscopy (IS) and are useful for studying hydration. Normalization of these quantities by dividing out changes in the pore fluid reveals information pertinent to the microstructural development of these materials. In this study, observations are made on the influence of accelerators, retarders and silica fume (SF) on pastes of white and ordinary portland cements (OPC). All systems show variations in the normalized electrical properties at the same degree of hydration, as compared to a control. Changes in the microstructure that are implied by these measurements are consistent with the observations of others.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1992

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References

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