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Identification of Microdefects in Multicrystalline Silicon

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

M. Werner
Affiliation:
Max-Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle/Saale
H. J. Möller
Affiliation:
Institute for Experimental Physics, TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Silbermannstraβe I, D-09599 Freiberg
E. Wolf
Affiliation:
Institute for Crystal Growth, Rudower Chaussee 6, D-12489, Berlin
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Abstract

Microdefects in multicrystalline silicon grown by directional solidification have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Their density (=106 cm−2) correlates with the density of shallow etch pits observed after chemomechanical polishing and selective etching. Different types of microdefects (size 10 – 100 nm) could be identified: i) spherical precipitates most likely amorphous silicon dioxide, ii) small plates lying on {111} planes and iii) groups of closely spaced stacking faults having the character of dipoles. It is argued that these defects are the result of agglomeration process of intrinsic point defects and impurities, where oxygen and carbon are the main candidates. A qualitative comparison to the point defects agglomeration observed in Cz material will be given.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1997

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References

Möller, H. J., Yang, D., Riedel, S.. Werner, M. and Wolf, E. Sixth Workshop on The Role of Impurities and Defects in Silicon Device Processing, August 12–14, 1996, Snowmass, Colorado, p. 3437 Google Scholar
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