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High Energy Density, High Operating Frequency and Energy Efficient On-Chip Inductors based on Coiled Carbon Nanotubes (CCNTs)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 July 2013

H. Faraby
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0407, USA
P. R. Bandaru
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Materials Science Program, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0411, USA
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Abstract

We demonstrate the superior inductive properties of coiled carbon nanotubes (CCNTs) through numerical computation and analytical modeling, for the next generation of nanoscale, on-chip inductors. Taking advantage of the kinetic inductance (L k ), particularly evident at the nanoscale we find that the inductance can be increased by three orders of magnitude through changing the tube radius as well as the coil radius while the device footprint of the CCNTs can be reduced by 60%. By varying the geometric parameters of the coiled structure, the external magnetic inductance (L M,ext ) can be as high as 20% of the L k . We also report that the self resonant frequency (f SR ) of CCNTs can be as much of the order of THz whereas the f SR of conventional copper(Cu) spiral inductors are limited to around 40GHz. Moreover when the material volume is considered, CCNTs have the potential to achieve Quality Factor (Q) eight times as Cu and when the footprint volume is considered Q can be twice as Cu All these promising properties of CCNTs make them a potential candidate for the entire frequency spectrum.

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2013 

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High Energy Density, High Operating Frequency and Energy Efficient On-Chip Inductors based on Coiled Carbon Nanotubes (CCNTs)
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