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High Electric Field Amorphous Silicon Structures : Application to Particle Detection

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 February 2011

B. Equer
Affiliation:
Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et des Couches Minces (UPR 258 CNRS), Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex, France
J.B. Chevrier
Affiliation:
Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et des Couches Minces (UPR 258 CNRS), Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex, France
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Abstract

Thin-film ionizing radiation detectors prepared from amorphous semiconductors are receiving a growing interest. To reach ultimate sensitivity, single particle detection is needed. Amorphous silicon detectors operated in this mode require a high polarization to overcome the limitations due to the low electron and hole effective mobilities and to charge trapping. In this review, we summarize results obtained on charged particle detection (electrons, protons and alphas) with special emphasis on the electron-hole pair generation and collection mechanisms. We report a study on the role of p-doped layers in obtaining high breakdown voltages (more than 7 × 105V/cm). Physical mechanisms underlying leakage current injection and generation are discussed.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1992

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References

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