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Hierarchy in Extended Chain Polymers 1

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 February 2011

P. E. Klunzinger
Affiliation:
The University of Akron Department and Institute of Polymer Science Akron OH, 44325-3909, USA
R. K. Eby
Affiliation:
The University of Akron Department and Institute of Polymer Science Akron OH, 44325-3909, USA
W. W. Adams
Affiliation:
Wright Research and Development Center Dayton OH 45433-6533, USA
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Abstract

Rigid rod polymers are of potential use in fibers for composites because of their high specific tensile strength and modulus as well as their high thermal stability. Some other common properties of systems meeting these criteria are a nonlinear elasticity (increasing Young's modulus with increasing tensile stress) and a negative coefficient of thermal expansion along the fiber axis. In composites, these two properties can combine to cause an increase of Young's modulus with increasing temperature and can lead to yielding or interfacial failure. The source of the nonlinear elasticity resides at two length scales: 1) the scale of the crystallites, (the reversible realignment of the crystallites along the fiber axis with increasing stress), and 2) at the scale of the molecules, (an inherent nonlinear elasticity of the molecules themselves). The former effect is reviewed and computational results for the latter are presented along with computational results for the molecular origin of the negative coefficient of thermal expansion.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1992

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Footnotes

1

Dedicated to the memory of Donald R. Ulrich, colleague and friend.

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