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Growth of Branched Carbon Nanostructures in Nanopatterned Surfaces Created by Focused Ion Beam

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Francisco Solá
Affiliation:
University of Puerto Rico, Physics, Ponce de Leon Av., Rio Piedras, 00931, Puerto Rico, 787-4695433
Oscar Resto
Affiliation:
oscar@uprrp.edu, University of Puerto Rico, Physics, Ponce de Leon Av., Rio Piedras, 00931, Puerto Rico
Azlin Biaggi-Labiosa
Affiliation:
a_biaggi77@yahoo.com, University of Puerto Rico, Physics, Ponce de Leon Av., Rio Piedras, 00931, Puerto Rico
Luis F Fonseca
Affiliation:
luis@uprrp.edu, University of Puerto Rico, Physics, Ponce de Leon Av., Rio Piedras, 00931, Puerto Rico
Corresponding
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Abstract

A method to grow arrays of multibranched carbon nanostructures is explained. We use the electron-beam-induced deposition method using a transmission electron microscope with ∼10−6 Torr vacuum where hydrocarbons are present in the chamber. Saw-tooth nano-patterns were made with a focused ion beam in porous silicon substrates. Due to the dielectric properties of the films the patterns provide the corresponding sites in which high local electric fields appear during irradiation thus allowing the hydrocarbons to become preferentially attracted to those active sites. We found that the adequate ion dose to create well defined saw-tooth nano-patterns was between 8 and 10 nC/μ2 at 30 kv. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy on the branched carbon nanostructures show a high concentration of sp2 sites suggesting that they are made of graphite-like amorphous carbon.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2008

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