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Graphene Role as Platinum Support for CO and Formic Acid Electrooxidation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 June 2011

Shirui Guo
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, University of California, Riverside.
Huseyin Sarialtin
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Riverside.
Shaun Alia
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical & Environmental Engineering, University of California, Riverside.
Hayri Engin Akin
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Riverside.
Yushan Yan
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical & Environmental Engineering, University of California, Riverside.
Cengiz S. Ozkan
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Riverside.
Mihrimah Ozkan
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Riverside.
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Abstract

The direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is a promising power source for electronic applications due to its high efficiency and compactness. To improve the efficiency, many support materials have been developed. We investigated uniform graphene nanoflake films as a support for catalytic Pt nanoparticles in direct carbon monooxide and formic acid electro-oxidation. Pt nanoparticles were deposited on the surface of graphene films with chemical reduction method. Chemical functionalization of graphene with ethylenediamine enables Pt nanoparticles mobilize on graphene uniformly. By simply changing the loading amount of Pt precursor, various particle sizes were achieved. The particle size of Pt plays prominent role in fuel cell test. The electrochemically active surface area of different sample are 6.3 (5 wt% Pt/G), 4.1 (20 wt% Pt/G), and 3.0 (50 wt% Pt/G) cm2mg-1 corresponding to the particle size 3±1nm, 10±2nm, 20±2nm respectively. The results obtained are ascribed to a uniform network made of 2-4 nm Pt monolayer nanopaticles on the surface of graphene flakes. Graphene will play significant role in developing next-generation advanced Pt based fuel cells and their relevant electrodes in the field of energy.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2011

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