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Formation and Characterization of Ohmic Contacts on Diamond

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 February 2011

V. Venkatesan
Affiliation:
Kobe Steel USA Inc., Electronic Materials Center, P. 0. Box 13608, Research Triangle Park, N. C. 27709
D.M. Malta
Affiliation:
Kobe Steel USA Inc., Electronic Materials Center, P. 0. Box 13608, Research Triangle Park, N. C. 27709
K. Das
Affiliation:
Kobe Steel USA Inc., Electronic Materials Center, P. 0. Box 13608, Research Triangle Park, N. C. 27709
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Abstract

Low resistance ohmic contacts have been fabricated on a naturally occurring lib diamond crystal and on polycrystalline diamond films by B ion-implantation and subsequent Ti/Au bilayer metallization. A high B concentration was obtained at the surface by ion implantation, a postimplant anneal and a subsequent chemical removal of the graphite layer. A bilayer metallization of Ti followed by Au, annealed at 850°C, yielded specific contact resistance values (as measured using a standard transmission line model (TLM) pattern) of the order of 10-5 Ω cm2 for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown polycrystalline films and the natural lib crystal. Specific contact resistance values have also been determined from circular TLM measurements on CVD films and the values compared to those from standard TLM measurements. These contacts were stable to a measurement temperature of ∼400°C and no degradation due to temperature cycling was observed.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1992

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References

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