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Finite Element Modeling of the Ferroelectroelastic Material Behavior in Consideration of Domain Wall Motions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Albrecht C. Liskowsky
Affiliation:
Institute for Solid Mechanics (IFKM) Technical University Dresden, 01069 Dresden, Germany
Artem S. Semenov
Affiliation:
Institute for Solid Mechanics (IFKM) Technical University Dresden, 01069 Dresden, Germany
Herbert Balke
Affiliation:
Institute for Solid Mechanics (IFKM) Technical University Dresden, 01069 Dresden, Germany
Robert M. McMeeking
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical and Environmental Engineering and Materials DepartmentUniversity of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, U.S.A.
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Abstract

A simulation of the nonlinear electromechanical macroscopic behavior of ferroelectric materials by means of the finite element method is presented. A material point is depicted by a representative volume element, for which homogeneous boundary conditions are valid. The evolution of integral averages over the representative volume element is to homogenize the results. For this homogenization we favor a finite element model in which each Gauss point represents exactly one single crystal. Their number of internal variables is limited to the lattice orientation and the volume fractions of the domains. The former are randomly distributed in space. It is possible to calculate the material behavior for arbitrary coupled and nonlinear electromechanical loading cases, but the model is not effective for the solution of boundary value problems for entire bodies.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2005

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References

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