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Field emission characteristics of carbon nanotubes synthesized by C3H4 and NH3 gases

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Taewon Jeong
Affiliation:
The National Creative Research Initiatives, Center for Electron Emission Source, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 111, Suwon, 440-600, Korea
Jae Hee Han
Affiliation:
Center for Nanotubes and Nanostructured Composite, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746, Korea
Whikun Yi
Affiliation:
The National Creative Research Initiatives, Center for Electron Emission Source, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 111, Suwon, 440-600, Korea
SeGi Yu
Affiliation:
The National Creative Research Initiatives, Center for Electron Emission Source, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 111, Suwon, 440-600, Korea
Jeonghee Lee
Affiliation:
The National Creative Research Initiatives, Center for Electron Emission Source, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 111, Suwon, 440-600, Korea
Jungna Heo
Affiliation:
The National Creative Research Initiatives, Center for Electron Emission Source, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 111, Suwon, 440-600, Korea
Chang Soo Lee
Affiliation:
The National Creative Research Initiatives, Center for Electron Emission Source, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 111, Suwon, 440-600, Korea
Ji-Beom Yoo
Affiliation:
Center for Nanotubes and Nanostructured Composite, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746, Korea
J. M. Kim
Affiliation:
The National Creative Research Initiatives, Center for Electron Emission Source, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 111, Suwon, 440-600, Korea
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Abstract

Using a gas mixture of propyne (C3H4) and ammonia (NH3) as a carbon precursor, we have successfully synthesized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by the direct current (dc) plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) onto Co-sputtered glass at 550°C. As the flow ratio of NH3 to C3H4 in the mixture gas increased, the crystallinity and alignment of CNTs were improved. In addition, the field emission characteristics of CNTs were also improved. the turn-on voltage became lower, and the current density and the field enhancement factor were more increasing. Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were utilized to confirm the effect of the gas flow ratio on CNTs. Therefore, the gas flow ratio was found to be one of important factors to govern the crystalline and field emission characteristics of CNTs. The growth mechanism of CNTs using a C3H4 gas is under investigation with the possibility that three carbon atoms in a C3H4 molecule is converted directly to a hexagon of a CNT by combining two molecules.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2002

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