Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684bc48f8b-l9xz9 Total loading time: 0.32 Render date: 2021-04-12T23:21:06.345Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Fibers Networks as a New Type of Core Material. Processing and Mechanical Properties

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Laurent Mezeix
Affiliation:
laurent.mezeix@ensiacet.fr, ENSIACET, CIRIMAT, 218 route de narbonne, Toulouse, 31077, France
Christophe Bouvet
Affiliation:
bouvet@lgmt.ups-tlse.fr, UPS, ICA, Toulouse, France
Serge Crézé
Affiliation:
Serge.creze@isae.fr, ISAE, DMSM, Toulouse, France
Dominique Poquillon
Affiliation:
Dominique.poquillon@ensiacet.fr, INP-ENSIACET, CIRIMAT, Toulouse, France
Get access

Abstract

Many different sandwich panels are used for aeronautical applications. Open and closed cell structured foam, balsa wood or honeycomb are often used as core materials. When the core material contains closed cells, water accumulation into the cell has to be taken into account. This phenomenon occurs when in service conditions lead to operate in humidity atmosphere. Then, water vapor from air naturally condenses on cold surfaces when the sandwich panel temperature decreases. This water accumulation might increase significantly the weight of the core material. Core with a ventilated structure helps to prevent this phenomenon. Periodic cellular metal (PCM) has been motivated by potential multifunctional applications that exploit their open architecture as well as their apparent superior strength and stiffness: pyramidal, lattice, Kagome truss or woven. One of the drawbacks of these materials is the expensive cost of the manufacturing. Recently, a novel type of sandwich has been developed with bonded metallic fibers as core material. This material presents attractive combination of properties like high specific stiffness, good damping capacity and energy absorption. Metal fibers bonded with a polymeric adhesive or fabricated in a mat-like form consolidated by solid state sintering. Entangled cross-linked carbon fibers have been also studied for using as core material by Laurent Mezeix. In the present study, ventilated core materials are elaborated from networks fibers. The simplicity of elaboration is one of the main advantages of this material. Multifunctional properties are given by mixing different sorts of fibers, by example adding fibers with good electrical conduction to give electrical conductivity properties. In this study network fibers as core material are elaborated using carbon fibers, glass fibers and stainless steel fibers. In aeronautical skins of sandwich panels used are often carbon/epoxy prepreg, so epoxy resin was used to cross-link fibers. The core thickness was chosen at 30 mm and fibers length was chosen at 40 mm. Entanglement, separation of filaments and cross-linking are obtained in a specific blower room. Fibers are introduced in the blower room, compressed air is applied and in same time epoxy resin is sprayed. Indeed one of the sandwich core material properties required is low density, so yarns size need to be decreased by separating filaments. Network fibers are introduced in a specific mould and then are compressed. The density obtained before epoxy spaying is 150 kg/m3. Finally samples are polymerized at 80°C for 2 hours in a furnace under laboratory air. Compressive behavior is study to determinate the influence of fibers natures and the effect of cross-linking. Reproducibility is also checked.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2009

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

[1] Ducheyne, P., Aernoudt, E., Meester, P., J. Mater. Sci. 13(12):2650(1978)10.1007/BF02402752CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[2] Clyne, T.W., Mason, J.F., Metal. Trans. A 18(8):1519(1987)10.1007/BF02646664CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[3] Delannay, F., Clyne, T.W., Proceedings of MetFoam'99, 14-16 June, Bremen, Germany (1999)Google Scholar
[4] Yamada, Y., Wen, C.E., Chino, Y., Shimojima, K., Hosokawa, H., Mabuchi, M., Mat. Sci. Forum 419:1013(2003)10.4028/www.scientific.net/MSF.419-422.1013CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[5] Markaki, A.E., Gergely, V., Cockburn, A., Clyne, T.W., Compos. Sci. Technol. 63(16):2345 (2003)10.1016/S0266-3538(03)00267-7CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[6] Woesz, A., Stampfl, J., Fratzl, P., Adv. Eng. Mater. 6(3):134 (2004)10.1002/adem.200300529CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[7] Delince, M., Delannay, F., Acta Mater. 52(4):1013 (2004)10.1016/j.actamat.2003.10.035CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[8] L.O., , , Golosnoy Cockburn, A., Clyne, T.W., Adv. Eng. Mater. 10(3):210(2008)Google Scholar
[9] Zhang, B.M., Zhao, S.Y., He, X.D. J. of Quant Spectro & Radiat Transf 109(7):1309(2008)10.1016/j.jqsrt.2007.10.008CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[10] Gustavsson, R., AB Volvo Patent WO 98/01295, (15th January 1998)Google Scholar
[11] Markaki, A.E., Clyne, T.W., US patent 10/000117, Cambridge University (2001)Google Scholar
[12] Markaki, A.E., Clyne, T.W., Acta Mater. 51(5):1341 (2003)10.1016/S1359-6454(02)00528-1CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[13] Markaki, A.E., Clyne, T.W., Acta Mater. 51(5):1351 (2003)10.1016/S1359-6454(02)00529-3CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[14] Dean, J. et al. Proceedings of ICCS8, Porto, Portugal, edited by Ferreira, ,: 199.Google Scholar
[15] Zhou, D., Stronge, W.J., Int. J. of Mech. Sci. 47(4-5):775 (2005)10.1016/j.ijmecsci.2004.10.013CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[16] Masse, J.P. Ph.D. Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble, France (2009)Google Scholar
[17] Mezeix, L., Bouvet, C., Castanié, B., Poquillon, D. (2008) Proceedings of ICCS8, Porto, Portugal, edited by Ferreira, , Portugal: 798 (2008)Google Scholar
[18] Clyne, T.W., Markaki, A.E., Tan, J.C., Compos. Sci. and Technol. 65(15-16):2492 (2005)10.1016/j.compsrefch.2005.05.037CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[19] Mezeix, L., Material Science Master’s degree, Univ. de Toulouse(2007)Google Scholar
[20] Gibson, L.J., Ashby, M.F., Cellular solids: structure and properties. Cambridge University Press(1997)10.1017/CBO9781139878326CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[21] Batchelor, W.J., He, J., Sampson, W.W., J. of Mater. Sci. 41(24):83378381 (2006)10.1007/s10853-006-0889-7CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[22] He, J., Batchelor, W.J., Johnston, R.E., J. of Mater. Sci. 42(2):522528 (2007)10.1007/s10853-006-1146-9CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[23] Toll, S. Polym. Eng. Sci. 38:1337 (1998)10.1002/pen.10304CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[24] Dodson, C.T.J., Tappi J 79(9):211216(1996)Google Scholar
[25] Phillipse, A.P., Langmuir 12(5):11271133(1996)10.1021/la950671oCrossRefGoogle Scholar
[26] Markaki, A.E., Clyne, T.W., Biomaterials 25(19):4805 (2004)10.1016/j.biomaterials.2003.11.041CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[27] Markaki, A.E., Clyne, T.W., Acta Mater. 53(3):877 (2005)10.1016/j.actamat.2004.10.037CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 8 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 12th April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Fibers Networks as a New Type of Core Material. Processing and Mechanical Properties
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Fibers Networks as a New Type of Core Material. Processing and Mechanical Properties
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Fibers Networks as a New Type of Core Material. Processing and Mechanical Properties
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *