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Ferroelectric Thin Film Depositions for Various Types of FeRAMs (Ferroelectric Random Access Memories)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Yoshihisa Fujisaki
Affiliation:
Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi Ltd. 1–280 Higashikoigakubo, Kokubunji, Tokyo 185–8601, JAPAN
Hiroshi Ishiwara
Affiliation:
Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259. Nagatsuda, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226–8503, JAPAN
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Abstract

Flash memories are now widely spread and conveniently used in mobile devices such as cellular phones, pagers, PDAs (Personal Digital Assistants), digital cameras and so on. And in the coming ubiquitous era, nonvolatile solid-state memories are expected to be more and more important for these mobile devices. However, Flash memories are not perfectly suitable for these mobile devices since their power consumptions are too high, writing speeds are two slow, programming endurances are limited up to 106 cycles. To resolve these problems, numbers of new nonvolatile solid-state memories are proposed and some of them are now under development. Among these newly emerging nonvolatile memories, FeRAMs (Ferroelectric Random Access Memories) are the only ones that are now in production. However, the process and materials to produce FeRAMs have not matured yet to support the ubiquitous technologies.

In this study, we explore the process technologies and materials required for the future FeRAMs and obtained the result that the requirements can be satisfied by the known technologies at present.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2005

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