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Fabrication of Piezoelectric Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) Microstructures by Soft Lithography for Tissue Engineering and Cell Biology Applications

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 March 2011

Daniel Gallego
Affiliation:
Biomedical Engineering, The Ohio State University, 270 Bevis Hall, 1080 Carmack Road, Columbus, OH, 43210
Nicholas J. Ferrell
Affiliation:
Biomedical Engineering, The Ohio State University, 270 Bevis Hall, 1080 Carmack Road, Columbus, OH, 43210
Derek J. Hansford
Affiliation:
Biomedical Engineering, The Ohio State University, 270 Bevis Hall, 1080 Carmack Road, Columbus, OH, 43210
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Abstract

A method for the fabrication of piezoelectric polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) microstructures is described. Embossed and individual features with highly defined geometries at the microscale were obtained using soft lithography-based techniques. Various structure geometries were obtained, including pillars (three different aspect ratios), parallel lines, and criss-crossed lines. SEM characterization revealed uniform patterns with dimensions ranging from 2 μm ñ 15 μm. Human osteosarcoma (HOS) cell cultures were used to evaluate the cytocompatibility of the microstructures. SEM and fluorescence microscopy showed adequate cell adhesion, proliferation, and strong interaction with tips and corners of the microdiscontinuities. Microfabricated piezoelectric PVDF structures could find applications in the fabrication of mechanically active tissue engineering scaffolds, and the development of dynamic sensors at the cellular and subcellular levels.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2007

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Fabrication of Piezoelectric Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) Microstructures by Soft Lithography for Tissue Engineering and Cell Biology Applications
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