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Excited State Relaxation Mechanisms in InP colloidal Quantum Dots.

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 March 2011

Garry Rumbles
Affiliation:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory Center for Basic Sciences Golden, CO 80401
Don Selmarten
Affiliation:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory Center for Basic Sciences Golden, CO 80401
Randy E. Ellingson
Affiliation:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory Center for Basic Sciences Golden, CO 80401
Jeff Blackburn
Affiliation:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory Center for Basic Sciences Golden, CO 80401
Pingrong Yu
Affiliation:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory Center for Basic Sciences Golden, CO 80401
Barton B. Smith
Affiliation:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory Center for Basic Sciences Golden, CO 80401
Olga I. Micic
Affiliation:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory Center for Basic Sciences Golden, CO 80401
Arthur J. Nozik
Affiliation:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory Center for Basic Sciences Golden, CO 80401
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Abstract

We report photoluminescence, linear absorption and femto-second transient bleaching spectra for a colloidal solution of indium phosphide (InP) quantum dots at ambient temperatures. The photoluminescence quantum yield is shown to depend not only upon the size of the quantum dots, with larger dots exhibiting higher quantum yields, but also upon the excitation wavelength. At short wavelengths, photoluminescence excitation spectra deviate markedly from the absorption spectra indicating that an efficient non-radiative deactivation pathway becomes prominent at these higher photon energies. We interpret this observation in terms of an inefficient relaxation mechanism between the second excited state and the lowest energy excited state from which the emission emanates. The results are consistent with the existence of a phonon bottleneck.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2001

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References

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