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Enhanced Diffusion of High-Temperature Implanted Aluminum in Silicon Carbide

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 February 2011

A V. Suvorov
Affiliation:
Cree Research Inc., Durham, NC 27713, USA, asuvorov@cree.com Physical Technical Institute RAS, St. Petersburg, 194021, Russia
I.O. Usov
Affiliation:
Physical Technical Institute RAS, St. Petersburg, 194021, Russia
V.V. Sokolov
Affiliation:
Physical Technical Institute RAS, St. Petersburg, 194021, Russia
A.A. Suvorova
Affiliation:
Physical Technical Institute RAS, St. Petersburg, 194021, Russia
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Abstract

The diffusion of aluminum in silicon carbide during high-temperature A1+ ion implantation was studied using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been used to determine the microstructure of the implanted sample. A 6H-SiC wafer was implanted at a temperature of 1800 °C with 40 keV Al ions to a dose of 2 x 1016 cm-2. It was established that an Al step-like profile starts at the interface between the crystal region and the damaged layer. The radiation enhanced diffusion coefficient of Al at the interface was determined to be Di = 2.8 x 10-12 cm2/s, about two orders of magnitude higher than the thermally activated diffusion coefficient. The Si vacancy-rich near-surface layer formed by this implantation condition is believed to play a significant role in enhanced Al diffusion.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1996

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References

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