Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Encapsulation and Reactivity of Proteins in Optically Transparent Porous Silicate Glasses Prepared by the Sol-Gel Method

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

Stacey A. Yamanaka
Affiliation:
University of California, Los Angeles, Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Los Angeles, CA 90024
Lisa M. Ellerby
Affiliation:
University of California, Los Angeles, Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Los Angeles, CA 90024
Ester H. Lan
Affiliation:
University of California, Los Angeles, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Los Angeles, CA 90024
Clinton R. Nishida
Affiliation:
University of California, Los Angeles, Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Los Angeles, CA 90024
Fumito Nishida
Affiliation:
University of California, Los Angeles, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Los Angeles, CA 90024
Bruce Dunn
Affiliation:
University of California, Los Angeles, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Los Angeles, CA 90024
Joan Selverstone Valentine
Affiliation:
University of California, Los Angeles, Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Los Angeles, CA 90024
Jeffrey I. Zink
Affiliation:
University of California, Los Angeles, Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Los Angeles, CA 90024
Get access

Abstract

Copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD), myoglobin, hemoglobin and glucose oxidase are encapsulated in stable, optically transparent, porous, silica glass matrices synthesized under mild conditions using novel sol-gel synthetic techniques. The biomolecules retain their characteristic reactivities and spectroscopic properties. The porous glasses allow transport of small molecules into and out of the glasses at reasonable rates but retain the protein molecules within the pores. The chemical reactions of the immobilized proteins are monitored by means of changes in their visible absorption spectra. Four encapsulated proteins are studied: CuZnSOD reacts with CN; metmyoglobin is reduced to its deoxy form and then reacts with O2 to make the oxy form and CO to make the carbonyl form; methemoglobin is reduced to its deoxy form and reacted with CO to make the carbonyl form; and glucose oxidase is reacted with glucose to make gluconic acid.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1992

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1) Brinker, C.J. and Scherer, G., Sol-Gel Science: The Physics and Chemistry of Sol-Gel Processing (Academic Press, Boston, 1990).Google Scholar
2) McKiernan, a. J.M., Pouxviel, J.C., Dunn, B., and Zink, J.I., J. Phys. Chem. 93, 2129 (1989). b. J.C. Pouxviel, B. Dunn, and J.I. Zink, J. Phys. Chem. 93, 2134, (1989). c. J.M. McKiernan, S.A. Yamanaka, B. Dunn, and J.I. Zink, J. Phys. Chem. 94, 5652 (1990). d. E.T. Knobbe, P.D. Fuqua, F. Nishida, and B. Dunn, Appl. Opt. 22, 2729 (1990). e. B. Dunn and J.I. Zink, J. Mater. Chem., 903 (1991). f. J. M. McKiernan, S.A. Yamanaka, E. Knobbe, J.C. Pouxviel, S. Parveneh, B. Dunn, and J.I. Zink, J. Inorg. Organomet. Polym. 1, 87 (1991).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3) Braun, S., Rappoport, S., Zusman, R., Avnir, D., and Ottolenghi, M., Mater. Lett. 10, 1 (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4) Esquivias, L. and Zarzycki, J. in Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Ultrastructure Processing, edited by Mackenzie, J.D. and Ulrich, D.R. (Wiley, New York, 1988) pp. 255270.Google Scholar
5) Ellerby, a. L.M., Nishida, C.R., Nishida, F., Yamanaka, S.A., Dunn, B., Valentine, J.S., and Zink, J.I. Science, 75L 1113 (1992). b. S.A. Yamanaka, F. Nishida, L.M. Ellerby, C.R. Nishida, B. Dunn, J.S. Valentine, and J.I. Zink, Chem. Mat., in press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6) Valentine, J.S. and Pantoliano, M.W., Copper Proteins, edited by Spiro, T.G. (Wiley, New York, 1981), pp. 291358 and references therein.Google Scholar
7) Valentine, J.S and Mota de Freitas, D., J. Chem Ed. 62, 990 (1985).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8) Fee, J.A. and Gaber, B.P., J. Biol. Chem. 247, 60 (1972).Google Scholar
9) Riflind, J.M, Inorganic Biochemistry. vol. I edited by Eichhorn, G.L. (Elsevier Scientific Publishing, New York, 1973) pp. 832901 and references therein.Google Scholar
10) Sage, J.T., Morikis, D. and Champion, P.M., Biochem. 30, 1227 (1991).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
11) Trinder, P., Ann. Clin. Biochem. 624 (1969).Google Scholar
12) Worthington, C.S. and Teller, J.D., Worthington Enzyme Manual (Freehold, NJ, 1972), p. 43.Google Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 9 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 27th January 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Hostname: page-component-898fc554b-4dk4j Total loading time: 0.231 Render date: 2021-01-27T17:57:47.635Z Query parameters: { "hasAccess": "0", "openAccess": "0", "isLogged": "0", "lang": "en" } Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false }

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Encapsulation and Reactivity of Proteins in Optically Transparent Porous Silicate Glasses Prepared by the Sol-Gel Method
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Encapsulation and Reactivity of Proteins in Optically Transparent Porous Silicate Glasses Prepared by the Sol-Gel Method
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Encapsulation and Reactivity of Proteins in Optically Transparent Porous Silicate Glasses Prepared by the Sol-Gel Method
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *