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Effects of the Grain Size on the Electrical Properties of Boron-Doped Polysilicon Films

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 February 2011

A. Kobayashi
Affiliation:
Dept. of Appl.Phys., Univ. of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113, JAPAN
S. Baba
Affiliation:
Dept. of Appl.Phys., Univ. of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113, JAPAN
A. Kinbara
Affiliation:
Dept. of Appl.Phys., Univ. of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113, JAPAN
H. Akimori
Affiliation:
Device Development Center, Hitachi Ltd., Ome, Tokyo 197, JAPAN
M. Kawaji
Affiliation:
Device Development Center, Hitachi Ltd., Ome, Tokyo 197, JAPAN
N. Owada
Affiliation:
Device Development Center, Hitachi Ltd., Ome, Tokyo 197, JAPAN
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Abstract

The electrical properties have been investigated on boron-doped polycrystalline silicon films with the average grain size of 50 nm and of 370 nm. It is shown that Hall mobility is strongly dependent on the grain size, and the temperature dependence is changed by hydrogenplasma treatment (HPT).

After the treatment in the larger grain film, the mobility of about 40 cm2/V sec is obtained and it shows the boron acceptor level of 0.043 eV, which is almost the same as that of the level in monocrystalline silicon. A kink in the mobility vs temperature curve which is observed in the smaller grain film disappears by HPT.

These phenomena will be discussed in relation to the density of the trapping states at the grain boundary of the films.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1990

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