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Effects of Porosity and Thermal Ageing on In-Plane Cracking Behavior of Thermal Barrier Coatings

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 March 2011


Z. Zhang
Affiliation:
Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames IA 5011, USA
J. Kameda
Affiliation:
Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames IA 5011, USA Office of Naval Research International Field Office, Tokyo 106, Japan
A. H. Swanson
Affiliation:
Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames IA 5011, USA
S. Sakurai
Affiliation:
Hitachi Works, Hitachi Ltd., Hitachi 317, Japan
M. Sato
Affiliation:
Tohoku Electric Power Co., Sendai 980, Japan

Abstract

This paper describes the effects of porosity and thermal ageing at 950°C for 4000 hr. in air on in-plane cracking behavior of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating (TBC) made up of 8 % yittria-stabilized zirconia. The in-plane TBC cracking was analyzed by a protruded TBC bend testing technique together with finite element stress analysis. As-deposited and aged TBC protruded specimens showed a large variation of porosity depending on the location of specimen extraction. The critical local tensile stress (s) necessary for the initiation of in-plane cracks for each specimen with different porosity was determined using elastic moduli (E) estimated from the porosity dependence of E. The s for in-plane cracking of the as-deposited TBC initially increased with increasing porosity and showed a peak when the porosity reached 0.23. It was shown that in-plane cracking at the interface of TBC and thermally grown oxides required much higher s than that at the interface of TBC and bond coatings. The thermal ageing led to a slight increase in s for away-from-interfacial TBC cracking. The dependence of in-plane TBC cracking behavior on the porosity is discussed in terms of effective critical stress via the Griffith criterion for porous materials.


Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2002

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Effects of Porosity and Thermal Ageing on In-Plane Cracking Behavior of Thermal Barrier Coatings
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