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Effect of Silica-Nanoparticle Dispersion on Holographic Recording in Methacrylate-Based Photopolymer Films

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Hiroshi Takahashi
Affiliation:
htakahas@ee.uec.ac.jp, University of Electro-Communications, Electronics Engineering, 1-5-1, Chofu-Gaoka,, Chofu, Tokyo, 182-8585, Japan, +81-424-43-5208, +81-424-43-5208
Takahiro Naitoh
Affiliation:
htakahas@ee.uec.ac.jp, University of Electro-Communications, Electronics Engineering, 1-5-1, Chofu-Gaoka, Chofu, Tokyo, 182-8585, Japan
Yasuo Tomita
Affiliation:
htakahas@ee.uec.ac.jp, University of Electro-Communications, Electronics Engineering, 1-5-1, Chofu-Gaoka, Chofu, Tokyo, 182-8585, Japan
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Abstract

Transmission volume holograms recorded in two types of methacrylate-based photopolymer films that include benzyl n-butyl phthalate (BBP) or Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) are studied. It is shown that both BBP and PMMA molecules can be uniformly dispersed into methacrylate monomers and that a refractive index modulation as high as ∼0.005 is recorded by optimizing their volume concentrations. Moreover, it is also shown that the additional doping of silica nanoparticles substantially suppresses polymerization shrinkage without increasing optical scattering loss.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2006

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Effect of Silica-Nanoparticle Dispersion on Holographic Recording in Methacrylate-Based Photopolymer Films
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