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Effect of hydrogen plasma treatment on the luminescence and photoconductive properties of ZnO nanowires

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Yanbo Li
Affiliation:
semifreeman@gmail.com, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
Ryohei Uchino
Affiliation:
uchinou@lelab.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
Takero Tokizono
Affiliation:
tokizono@lelab.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
Alexander Paulsen
Affiliation:
paulsenalex@gmail.com, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
Miao Zhong
Affiliation:
miaozhong@lelab.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
Masaki Shuzo
Affiliation:
shuzo@lelab.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
Ichiro Yamada
Affiliation:
yamada@t.u-tokyo.ac.jp, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
Jean-Jacques Delaunay
Affiliation:
jean@t.u-tokyo.ac.jp, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
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Abstract

ZnO nanowires with strong green emission synthesized by chemical vapor deposition were treated using hydrogen plasma. The effect of hydrogen plasma treatment was studied by means of photoluminescence and photoconductivity. A strong passivation of the green emission and a significant enhancement of the near band edge emission were found after the hydrogen plasma treatment. The conductivity of the nanowires in dark was increased by more than 3 orders of magnitude. The photoconductivity also increased after the hydrogen plasma treatment. The observed changes in the luminescence and photoconductive properties of the ZnO nanowires were likely caused by hydrogen atoms occupying both oxygen vacancies and interstitial sites.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2010

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Effect of hydrogen plasma treatment on the luminescence and photoconductive properties of ZnO nanowires
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