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The Effect of Grain-Boundary and Matrix Precipitates on High Temperature Strength in Fe3Al Based Alloys

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 February 2011

Ryo Makihara
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho Naka-ku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531, Japan
Satoru Kobayashi
Affiliation:
Osaka Center for Industrial Materials Research, Institute of Materials Research, Tohoku University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531, Japan
Takayuki Takasugi
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho Naka-ku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531, Japan Osaka Center for Industrial Materials Research, Institute of Materials Research, Tohoku University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531, Japan
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Abstract

The effect of grain boundary (GB) and matrix precipitates on high temperature strength was investigated in Fe3Al base alloys containing Cr, Mo and C. Tensile tests were conducted at 600°C for three types of microstructures consisting of: (I) film-like κ phase precipitates covering GBs and fine M2C particles in the matrix, (II) only fine M2C particles in the matrix and (III) no second-phase particles in the matrix. It was found that κ films on GBs are more than twice as effective as finely dispersed M2C particles for improving the proof stress.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2011

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References

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