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Dislocation Motion in λ Tial Studied by in situ Straining Experiments in the Hvem

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 February 2011

Ulrich Messerschmidt
Affiliation:
Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, Halle, D-06120, Germany
Martin Bartsch
Affiliation:
Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, Halle, D-06120, Germany
Dietrich Häussler
Affiliation:
Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, Halle, D-06120, Germany
Mark Aindow
Affiliation:
School of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, POB 363, Birmingham, B15 2TT, England
Rainer Hattenhauer
Affiliation:
Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, Halle, D-06120, Germany
Ian P. Jones
Affiliation:
School of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, POB 363, Birmingham, B15 2TT, England
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Abstract

Micro-tensile specimens of coarse-grained Ti52at%Al crystals have been deformed in situ in a high voltage electron microscope at room temperature. In addition to some twinning, “simple” 1/2〈110] dislocations as well as superdislocations were moving, with the simple dislocations prevailing even if their orientation factor is lower than that of the superdislocations. Both types of dislocations are pinned, probably by small precipitates having a distance along the dislocations of about 100 nm. The precipitates consist most probably of Al2O3. Under stress, the dislocations bow out between the obstacles. The bowing is stronger for 1/2〈110] dislocations. An effective stress of about 41 MPa is estimated from their curvature. The kinematic behaviour of the dislocations is in accord with precipitation hardening. The dislocations are generated by the double-cross slip mechanism. Their density within the slip bands corresponds to a long-range internal stress of about 40 MPa. These data are consistent with the flow stress of PST crystals in the easy orientation, taken from the literature.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1995

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