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Difference in Secondary Defects between High Energy B+ and Al+ implanted 4H-SiC

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 March 2011

Toshiyuki Ohno
Affiliation:
Ultra-Low-Loss Power Device Technology Research Body and Advanced Power Devices Laboratory, R&D Association for Future Electron Devices, c/o Electrotechnical Laboratory, 1–1–4 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305–8568 Japan
Naoto Kobayashi
Affiliation:
Ultra-Low-Loss Power Device Technology Research Body and Electrotechnical Laboratory, 1–1–4 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305–8568 Japan
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Abstract

The differences of secondary defects between B+ and Al+ implanted layers in high-energy implantation were investigated. At the same volume concentration of implanted ion, density of secondary defects in Al+ implanted layer is higher than that in B+ implanted layer. On the contrary, mean defect size in B+ implanted layer is larger than that in Al+ implanted layer. The structure of secondary defect is thought to be a dislocation loop formed by an extra Si-C layer or localized lattice strain correlated to agglomerated interstitials. The amount of interstitials used for secondary defect formation is estimated. It almost coincides the same amount of implanted ions, and this correlation doesn't depend on ion species. B+ and Al+ implanted layers have different activation energy for secondary defect formation. This result means that they have different agglomerating mechanism of interstitials, which cause the differences of defect size and density between them.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2001

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References

[1] Iwasaki, T., Ohno, T., Asano, K., Sugawara, Y. and Yatsuo, T., Mat. Sci. Forum 264–268, 1085 (1998)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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[5] Ohno, T. and Kobayashi, N., J. Appl. Phys. 89, 993 (2001)CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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