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Dielectric characteristics of Poly(chloro-p-Xylene) thin films for high energy density pulsed power capacitors

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Pratyush Tewari
Affiliation:
put115@psu.edu, Pennsylvania State University, Engineering Science and Mechanics, Room No 274 Materials Research Lab, Penn state Universuty, State College, PA, 16802, State College, PA, 16802, United States, 814-441-5153
Eugene Furman
Affiliation:
euf1@psu.edu, Pennsylvania State University, Materials Research Laboratory, University park, PA, 16802, United States
Michael T. Lanagan
Affiliation:
mxl46@psu.edu, Pennsylvania State University, Materials Research Laboratory, University park, PA, 16802, United States
Corresponding
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Abstract

Poly(chloro-p- Xylene) or Parylene –C thin films are particularly attractive for dielectric as well as biomedical applications. In the current work the dielectric properties of Parylene-C thin films are investigated to form laminar composites with oxide thin films for high energy density pulsed power capacitors. Parylene-C thin films were synthesized by pyrolytic vapor decomposition polymerization of dichloro-di(p-Xylene) monomer. Annealing of films at 225°C has shown to enhance crystallinity of film. Conduction in Parylene-C thin films appears to be bulk-controlled with the hopping charges contributing to leakage current. The barrier height of 0.89eV and hopping distance of 2 - 2.5nm are physically plausible and similar to previously reported values in polymer literature.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2007

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