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Diamond Nanopit Arrays Fabricated by Room-Temperature Nanoimprinting using Diamond Molds

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 March 2011

Shuji Kiyohara
Affiliation:
Advanced Faculty of Electric and Control System Engineering Course, Maizuru National College of Technology, 234 Aza Shiroya, Maizuru, Kyoto 625-8511, Japan
Masaya Kumagai
Affiliation:
Advanced Faculty of Electric and Control System Engineering Course, Maizuru National College of Technology, 234 Aza Shiroya, Maizuru, Kyoto 625-8511, Japan
Yoshio Taguchi
Affiliation:
Application and Technical Section, ELIONIX INC., 3-7-6 Motoyokoyama, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0063, Japan
Yoshinari Sugiyama
Affiliation:
Application and Technical Section, ELIONIX INC., 3-7-6 Motoyokoyama, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0063, Japan
Yukiko Omata
Affiliation:
Application and Technical Section, ELIONIX INC., 3-7-6 Motoyokoyama, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0063, Japan
Yuichi Kurashima
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical System Engineering, University of Yamanashi, 4-3-11 Takeda, Kofu, Yamanashi 400-8511, Japan
Hirofumi Takikawa
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580, Japan
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Abstract

We have investigated the nanopatterning of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond films in room-temperature nanoimprint lithography (RT-NIL), using a diamond nanodot mold. We have proposed the use of polysiloxane as an electron beam (EB) mask and RT-imprint resist materials. The diamond molds of cylinder dot using the RT-NIL process were fabricated with polysiloxane oxide mask in EB lithography technology. The dot in minimum diameter is 500 nm. The pitch between the dots is 2 μm, and dot has a height of about 600 nm. It was found that the optimum imprinting conditions for the RT-NIL : time from spin-coating to imprinting t 1 of 1 min , pressure time t 2 of 5 min, imprinting pressure P of 0.5 MPa. The imprint depth obtained after the press under their conditions was 500 nm. We carried out the RT-NIL process for the fabrication of diamond nanopit arrays, using the diamond nanodot molds that we developed. The resulting diamond nanopit arrays with 500 nm-diameter and 200 nm-depth after the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) oxygen ion beam etching were fabricated. The diameter of diamond nanopit arrays was in good agreement with that of the diamond nanodot mold.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2011

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