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Defect-Solute Interactions Near Irradiated Grain Boundaries

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 February 2011

E. P. Simonen
Affiliation:
Pacific Northwest Laboratory, P. 0. BOX 999/ P8-15, Richland, WA 99352
J. S. Vetrano
Affiliation:
Pacific Northwest Laboratory, P. 0. BOX 999/ P8-15, Richland, WA 99352
H. L. Heinisch
Affiliation:
Pacific Northwest Laboratory, P. 0. BOX 999/ P8-15, Richland, WA 99352
S. M. Bruemmer
Affiliation:
Pacific Northwest Laboratory, P. 0. BOX 999/ P8-15, Richland, WA 99352
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Abstract

Defect-solute interactions control radiation-induced segregation (RIS) to interfacial sinks, such as grain boundaries, in metallic materials. The best studied system in this regard has been austenitic stainless steels. Measurements of grain boundary composition indicate that RIS of major alloying elements is in reasonable agreement with inverse-Kirkendall predictions. The steep and narrow composition profiles are shown to result from limited back diffusion near the boundary. Subsequently, defect-solute interactions that affect the near-boundary defect concentrations strongly affect RIS. The variability in measured RIS may in part be caused by grain boundary characteristics.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1994

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References

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