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CuO nanowire–Co3O4 nanoparticle heterostructures and their vertically aligned and horizontally suspended architectures

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011


Wenwu Shi
Affiliation:
nchopra@eng.ua.edu, The University of Alabama, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Center for Materials for Information Technology (MINT), Tuscaloosa, Alabama, United States
Nitin Chopra
Affiliation:
nchopra@bama.ua.edu, The University of Alabama, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Center for Materials for Information Technology (MINT), Tuscaloosa, Alabama, United States
Corresponding

Abstract

Well-controlled architectures (aligned or horizontally suspended) of CuO nanowire (average diameter ~75±18 nm)-Co3O4 nanoparticle (average diameter ~7±1 nm) heterostructures were fabricated in a simple and surfactant-free growth approach. This approach coupled microfabrication methods with a thermal growth method and wet-coating technique. The fabricated heterostructures were characterized by high resolution electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) for their size, morphology, phases, interfaces, and composition of heterostructures. Finally, CuO nanowire–Cox3O4 nanoparticle heterostructures were utilized as photocatalyst to degrade organic dye (methyl orange) under a wide range of wavelengths (from UV, 265 nm, to visible region, 580 nm).


Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2010

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