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Correlation of Nanoindentation and Conventional Mechanical Property Measurements

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 March 2011

Philip M. Rice
Affiliation:
IBM Almaden Research Center, San Jose, CA, USA, pmrice@almaden.ibm.com
Roger E. Stoller
Affiliation:
Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA, rkn@ornl.gov
Corresponding
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Abstract

A series of model ferritic alloys and two commercial steels were used to develop a correlation between tensile yield strength and nano-indentation hardness measurements. The NanoIndenterII® was used with loads as low as 0.05 gf (0.490 mN) and the results were compared with conventional Vickers microhardness measurements using 200 and 500 gf (1.96 and 4.90 N) loads. Two methods were used to obtain the nanohardness data: (1) constant displacement depth and (2) constant load. When the nanohardness data were corrected to account for the difference between projected and actual indenter contact area, good correlation between the Vickers and nanohardness measurements was obtained for hardness values between 0.7 and 3 GPa. The correlation based on constant nanoindentation load was slightly better than that based on constant nanoindentation displacement. Tensile property measurements were made on these same alloys, and the expected linear relationship between Vickers hardness and yield strength was found, leading to a correlation between measured changes in nanohardness and yield strength changes.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2001

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