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Comparison of -OH and -NH2 Functional Group Substitution on PTFE Surface with V-UV Photon Irradiation for Protein Adsorption

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Yuji Sato
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Tokai University 1117 Kitakaname Hiratsuka Kanagawa, 259–1292, JAPAN
Naoki Kobayashi
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Tokai University 1117 Kitakaname Hiratsuka Kanagawa, 259–1292, JAPAN
Masataka Murahara
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Tokai University 1117 Kitakaname Hiratsuka Kanagawa, 259–1292, JAPAN
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Abstract

Poly-tetrafluoroethylene [PTFE] presents few rejections in a living body but has low tissue affinity. Then, the soft tissue implant material that has not only high biocompatibility but also superb bondability has been developed by photo-chemically substituting the hydrophilic of –OH or –NH2 groups on the PTFE surface with V-UV photon irradiation. The protein adsorption of the sample before and after treatment was also evaluated by scanning electron microscope [SEM] and attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared [ATR FT-IR], using bovine serum albumin [ALB] and fibrin [FIB] solution as a protein index in biocompatibility test. From the results, it has been confirmed that the protein adsorption increased with the increase in the hydrophilic group's substitution density. The -OH incorporated sample adsorbed the ALB and FIB more than the -NH2 incorporated sample; the amount of the ALB and FIB sticking became 2.3 times larger than that of the non-treatment sample.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2005

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Comparison of -OH and -NH2 Functional Group Substitution on PTFE Surface with V-UV Photon Irradiation for Protein Adsorption
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Comparison of -OH and -NH2 Functional Group Substitution on PTFE Surface with V-UV Photon Irradiation for Protein Adsorption
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Comparison of -OH and -NH2 Functional Group Substitution on PTFE Surface with V-UV Photon Irradiation for Protein Adsorption
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