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Clinical and Laboratory Experience with the use of Titanium and Titanium Type 318 Alloy for Bone and Joint Replacement

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 February 2011

Keith W. J. Wright
Affiliation:
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Institute of Orthopaedics (University of London), Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Brockley Hill, Stanmore, Middlesex, England
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Abstract

Commercially pure titanium type T5 and titanium type TAl alloy have been used at Stanmore in major bone and joint replacement prostheses since 1963 and 1971 respectively. Because laboratory studies indicated cast CoCrMo alloy to be a superior bearing material both titanium materials have been joined to cast CoCrMo alloy bearing elements to form composite prostheses with no apparent adverse clinical effects.

Laboratory studies and clinical experience have shown the inadequacy of the fatigue properties of titanium type T5 and cast CoCrMo alloy for highly stressed intramedullary stems. Nevertheless, although titanium type TAl alloy has superior fatigue properties highly stressed components of this material are not immune to fatigue failure.

Wear of U.H.M.W.P.E. appears to be greater when articulated with titanium type TAI alloy than it is when articulated with cast CoCrMo alloy and Al2O3 counterfaces. In addition, capsular tissue which rubs on titanium type TAl alloy can become heavily pigmented. However, to date no clinical complications appear to have resulted from either of these shortcomings. Whether a surface treatment for titanium type TAl alloy such as ion implantation will both improve its wear characteristics with U.H.M.W.P.E. and reduce the amount of metallic material liberated into the soft tissues has yet to be established.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1986

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References

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