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Chemically Modified Second Harmonic Generation at Surfaces on Vicinal Si(111) Wafers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 February 2011

U. Emmerichs
Affiliation:
Institute of Semiconductor Electronics II, Rheinisch-Westfälische Technische Hochschule, 5100 Aachen, Germany
C. Meyer
Affiliation:
Institute of Semiconductor Electronics II, Rheinisch-Westfälische Technische Hochschule, 5100 Aachen, Germany
K. Leo
Affiliation:
Institute of Semiconductor Electronics II, Rheinisch-Westfälische Technische Hochschule, 5100 Aachen, Germany
H. Kurz
Affiliation:
Institute of Semiconductor Electronics II, Rheinisch-Westfälische Technische Hochschule, 5100 Aachen, Germany
C. H. Bjorkman
Affiliation:
Departments of Physics, and Material Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695–8202, USA
C. E. Shearon Jr
Affiliation:
Departments of Physics, and Material Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695–8202, USA
Y. Ma
Affiliation:
Departments of Physics, and Material Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695–8202, USA
T. Yasuda
Affiliation:
Departments of Physics, and Material Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695–8202, USA
G. Lucovsky
Affiliation:
Departments of Physics, and Material Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695–8202, USA
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Abstract

Using surface second harmonic generation (SSHG) at 1053nm, we study the influence of off-axis orientation and surface structure of silicon (111) surfaces. We study wafers cut at angles between 0° and 5° in the [112] direction. The surface structure is varied by thermal oxidation at 850°C, annealing, and thinning the oxide in a HF solution. For comparison, nitride films are also investigated. The characteristic rotational symmetry of the SSHG-signal for (111) flat (non-vicinal) surfaces is enhanced by a Si/SiO2 interface. The oxide layer also influences the signals due to the steps on vicinal surfaces. The results are discussed in comparison with a microscopic model of the oxidized misoriented surface.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1993

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References

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