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Characterizations of Core-Shell Nanoparticle Catalysts for Methanol Electrooxidation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 February 2011

Mathew M. Maye
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, NY 13902.
Jin Luo
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, NY 13902.
Wai-Ben Chan
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, NY 13902.
Li Han
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, NY 13902.
Nancy Kariuki
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, NY 13902.
H. Richard Naslund
Affiliation:
Department of Geological Sciences, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, NY 13902.
Mark H. Engelhard
Affiliation:
Environmental and Molecular Science Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, 99352.
Yuehe Lin
Affiliation:
Department of Geological Sciences, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, NY 13902.
Randoll Sze
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, NY 13902.
Chuan-Jian Zhong
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, NY 13902.
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Abstract

This paper describes the results of an investigation of the structure and composition of core-shell gold and alloy nanoparticles as catalytically active nanomaterials for potential fuel cell catalysis. Centered on the electrocatalytic methanol oxidation, we show three sets of results based on electrochemical, surface, and composition characterizations. First, electrochemical studies have revealed that the nanostructured catalysts are active towards the electrooxidation of methanol and carbon monoxide. Second, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data have shown that the organic encapsulating shells can be effectively removed electrochemically or thermally, which involves the formation of oxides on the nanocrystals. Thirdly, direct current plasma - atomic emission spectrometry (DCP-AES) has revealed insights for the correlation of the composition of alloy nanoparticles with the catalytic activities. Implications of these results to the design of nanostructured catalysts will also be discussed.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2003

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