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Characterization of Thick 4H-SiC Hot-Wall CVD Layers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2011


M. J. Paisley
Affiliation:
Cree Research, Inc., 4600 Silicon Drive, Durham, NC 27703–8475, USA
K. G. Irvine
Affiliation:
Cree Research, Inc., 4600 Silicon Drive, Durham, NC 27703–8475, USA
O. Kordina
Affiliation:
Cree Research, Inc., 4600 Silicon Drive, Durham, NC 27703–8475, USA
R. Singh
Affiliation:
Cree Research, Inc., 4600 Silicon Drive, Durham, NC 27703–8475, USA
J. W. Palmour
Affiliation:
Cree Research, Inc., 4600 Silicon Drive, Durham, NC 27703–8475, USA
C. H. Carter
Affiliation:
Cree Research, Inc., 4600 Silicon Drive, Durham, NC 27703–8475, USA

Abstract

Epitaxial 4H-SiC layers suitable for high power devices have been grown in a hot-wall chemical-vapor deposition (CVD) system. These layers were subsequently characterized for many parameters important in device development and production. The uniformity of both thickness and doping will be presented.

Doping trends vs. temperature and growth rate will be shown for the p-type dopant used. The n-type dopant drops in concentration with increasing temperature or increasing growth rate. In contrast, the p-type dopant increases in concentration with decreasing temperature or increasing growth rate. A simple descriptive model for this behavior will be presented.

The outcome from capacitance-voltage and SIMS measurements demonstrate that transitions from n to n , or p to p , and even n to p levels can be made quickly without adjustment to growth conditions. The ability to produce sharp transitions without process changes avoids degrading the resulting surface morphology or repeatability of the process. Avoiding process changes is particularly important in growth of thick layers since surface roughness tends to increase with layer thickness.

Device results from diodes producing two different blocking voltages in excess of 5 kV will also be shown. The higher voltage diodes exhibited a breakdown behavior which was near the theoretical limit for the epitaxial layer thickness and doping level grown.


Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1999

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References

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