Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Characterization of Post - Annealed PZT Thin Films Deposited Using Pulsed Laser Ablation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011


Jyrki Lapp Alainen
Affiliation:
University of Oulu, Microelectronics and Material Physics Laboratories, Linnanmaa, 90570 Oulu, Finland
Johannes Frantti
Affiliation:
University of Oulu, Microelectronics and Material Physics Laboratories, Linnanmaa, 90570 Oulu, Finland
Seppo Leppävuori
Affiliation:
University of Oulu, Microelectronics and Material Physics Laboratories, Linnanmaa, 90570 Oulu, Finland

Abstract

Pulsed laser ablation was used to deposit Nd-doped lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin films with a thickness of from 100 to 800 nm from a Pb0.97 Nd0.02(Zr0.55Ti0.45)O3 target. The films were ablated onto sapphire and MgO substrates using a XeCl excimer laser (pulse energy 50 mJ, wavelength 308 nm, pulse duration 20 ns). The distance between the target and the substrates was 40 mm, and the angle between the target normal and the incident beam was 45 °. The films were post-annealed in air at various temperatures (600 – 900 °C) with PZT powder. It was found that the laser beam energy density on the surface of the target had a significant effect on the composition of the films, the number of particulates on the surface of the films and the growth rates of the films. Lead deficiency was found in the films in the case of high fluence (> 1.5 J/cm2) while low fluence values (< 1.0 J/cm2) gave an excess of lead and too low Zr/(Zr+Ti) ratios. The particulate number density was low for fluence values between 0.5 and 1.5 J/cm2. EDS and X-ray diffraction was used to determine the composition and the crystal structure of the annealed films. The films deposited using a low fluence showed increasing tetragonal c/a-ratio with increasing post-annealing temperatures. Raman spectra measured from annealed films were found to be typical of PZT.


Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1995

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1. Lichtenwalner, D.J., Dat, R., Auciello, O. and Kingon, A.I., presented at the IMF8, Maryland 1993.Google Scholar
2. Lappalainen, J., Franiti, J., Moilanen, H. and Leppävuori, S., accepted for publication in Sensors and Actuators.Google Scholar
3. Nagata, K. and Furuno, M., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 31, 3201 (1992).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4. Peng, C.H. and Desu, S.B., J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 77, 1799 (1994).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5. Adachi, M., Matsuzaki, T., Yamada, T., Shiosaki, T. and Kawabata, A., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 26, 550 (1987).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. Li, Jie-Fang, Viehland, D.D., Tani, T., Lakeman, C.D.E. and Payne, D.A., J. Appl. Phys. 75, 442 (1994).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7. Leuchtner, R.E., Horwitz, J.S. and Chrisey, D.B., Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. 243, 525 (1992).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8. Frantti, J. and Lantto, V., J. Appl. Phys. 76, 2139 (1994).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9. Lichtenwalner, D.J., Auciello, O., Dat, R. and Kingon, A.I., J. Appl. Phys. 74, 7497 (1993).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10. Burns, G. and Scott, B.A., Phys. Rev. Lett. 25, 1191 (1970).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 1 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 4th December 2020. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Hostname: page-component-b4dcdd7-z76xg Total loading time: 0.281 Render date: 2020-12-04T18:20:29.339Z Query parameters: { "hasAccess": "0", "openAccess": "0", "isLogged": "0", "lang": "en" } Feature Flags last update: Fri Dec 04 2020 18:00:13 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time) Feature Flags: { "metrics": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "peerReview": true, "crossMark": true, "comments": true, "relatedCommentaries": true, "subject": true, "clr": false, "languageSwitch": true }

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Characterization of Post - Annealed PZT Thin Films Deposited Using Pulsed Laser Ablation
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Characterization of Post - Annealed PZT Thin Films Deposited Using Pulsed Laser Ablation
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Characterization of Post - Annealed PZT Thin Films Deposited Using Pulsed Laser Ablation
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *