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Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes/Cu Nanocomposites Processed by Using Nano-sized Cu Powders

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 March 2011

Kyung Tae Kim
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701, Korea
Kyong Ho Lee
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701, Korea
Seung Il Cha
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701, Korea
Chan-Bin Mo
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701, Korea
Soon Hyung Hong*
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701, Korea
*
Address all correspondence to this author Email: shhong@kaist.ac.kr
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Abstract

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted remarkable attention as reinforcement for composites owing to their outstanding properties1-3. CNT/Cu nanocomposites were fabricated by mixing the nano-sized Cu powders with multi-wall carbon nanotubes and followed by the spark plasma sintering process. The CNT/Cu nanocomposite fabricated from nano-sized Cu powders shows more homogeneous distribution of CNTs in matrix compared to that fabricated from macro-sized Cu powders. The hardness of CNT/Cu nanocomposite fabricated from nano-sized Cu powders increases with increasing the volume fraction of CNTs, while the hardness of that fabricated from macro-sized Cu powders decreases with the addition of CNTs.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2004

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