Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Biosensor based on DNA directed immobilization of enzymes onto optically sensitive porous Si

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 July 2013

Giorgi Shtenberg
Affiliation:
The Inter-Departmental Program of Biotechnology, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000, Israel
Naama Massad-Ivanir
Affiliation:
Department of Biotechnology and Food Engineering, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000, Israel
Oren Moscovitz
Affiliation:
Department of Biological Chemistry, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Sinem Engin
Affiliation:
Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, DFG – Center for Functional Nanostructures, Karlsruhe 76131, Germany
Michal Sharon
Affiliation:
Department of Biological Chemistry, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Ljiljana Fruk
Affiliation:
Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, DFG – Center for Functional Nanostructures, Karlsruhe 76131, Germany
Ester Segal
Affiliation:
Department of Biotechnology and Food Engineering, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000, Israel The Russell Berrie Nanotechnology Institute, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000, Israel
Get access

Abstract

Optical biosensor for monitoring proteolytic activity is constructed by DNA-directed immobilization of enzymes onto porous Silicon nanostructures. This sensor configuration allows both protease recycling and easy surface regeneration for subsequent biosensing analysis by means of mild dehybridization conditions. We demonstrate real-time analysis of minute quantities of proteases paving the way for substrate profiling and the identification of cleavage sites. The biosensor is compatible with common proteomic methods and allows for a successful downstream mass spectrometry analysis of the reaction products.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2013 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Schilling, O. and Overall, C. M., Curr. Opin. Chem. Biol. 11, 36 (2007).10.1016/j.cbpa.2006.11.037CrossRef
Neurath, H., Science 224, 350 (1984).CrossRef
Turk, B., Nat. Rev. Drug Discovery 5, 785 (2006).CrossRef
Overall, C. M. and Blobel, C. P., Nat. Rev. Mol. Cell Biol. 8, 245 (2007).CrossRef
Jane, A., Dronov, R., Hodges, A. and Voelcker, N. H., Trends Biotechnol. 27, 230 (2009).CrossRef
Massad-Ivanir, N., Shtenberg, G., Tzur, A., Krepker, M. A. and Segal, E., Anal. Chem. 83, 3282 (2011).CrossRef
Orosco, M. M., Pacholski, C. and Sailor, M. J., Nat. Nanotechnol. 4, 255 (2009).CrossRef
Kilian, K. A., Boecking, T. and Gooding, J. J., Chem. Commun., 630 (2009).
DeLouise, L. A., Kou, P. M. and Miller, B. L., Anal. Chem. 77, 3222 (2005).10.1021/ac048144+CrossRef
Fruk, L., Mueller, J., Weber, G., Narvaez, A., Dominguez, E. and Niemeyer, C. M., Chem.–Eur. J. 13, 5223 (2007).CrossRef
Niemeyer, C. M., Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 49, 1200 (2010).CrossRef
Shtenberg, G., Massad-Ivanir, N., Moscovitz, O., Engin, S., Sharon, M., Fruk, L. and Segal, E., Anal. Chem. 85, 1951 (2013).CrossRef
Shtenberg, G., Massad-Ivanir, N., Engin, S., Sharon, M., Fruk, L. and Segal, E., Nanoscale Res. Lett. 7, (2012).CrossRef
Massad-Ivanir, N., Shtenberg, G., Zeidman, T. and Segal, E., Adv. Funct. Mater. 20, 2269 (2010).CrossRef

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 8 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 24th January 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Hostname: page-component-76cb886bbf-2sjx4 Total loading time: 0.361 Render date: 2021-01-24T05:21:29.608Z Query parameters: { "hasAccess": "0", "openAccess": "0", "isLogged": "0", "lang": "en" } Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false }

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Biosensor based on DNA directed immobilization of enzymes onto optically sensitive porous Si
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Biosensor based on DNA directed immobilization of enzymes onto optically sensitive porous Si
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Biosensor based on DNA directed immobilization of enzymes onto optically sensitive porous Si
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *