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Biomedical Materials to Repair Retinal Detachments

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 February 2011

Miguel F. Refojo
Affiliation:
Eye Research Institute of Retina Foundation, 20 Staniford St., Boston, MA 02114, and Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston
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Abstract

Implants are essential for the repair of retinal detachments. The implant buckles the wall of the eye and apposes the detached retina with the choroid, thus restoring light sensitivity to the retina. The scleral buckling also relieves traction on the retina from a shrinking vitreous body. The implant materials most commonly used are solid silicone rubber and silicone sponges, but both types have some disadvantages. A poly(hydroxyethyl acrylate-co-methyl acrylate) hydrogel implant with improved properties of softness and antibiotic absorption is also available for retinal detachment surgery. Proliferative vitreoretinopathy involves various conditions of retinal detachment complicated by vitreous fibrosis, which, after vitrectomy, may be treated with intraocular injection of fluids that support the retina against the choroid. For conditions requiring a long-term implant, silicone oil although controversial is the material of choice. Many other substances have been investigated but none better has yet been found.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1986

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References

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